Know The Different Types Of Oatmeal

Know The Different Types Of Oatmeal

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Being a part of the generation where we want things to be done easily and move as quickly as possible because everything seems in the queue, oatmeal becomes my top priority and on-the-go breakfast.

Lately, I have become more practical and health-conscious at the same time because I want to be more productive by using less of my time and energy to prepare my food. Then, I found oatmeal! Nope, this wasn’t the first time I ate oatmeal – I just discovered that oatmeal has more qualities hidden than what you think.

As we commonly know that oatmeals are packed with high-quality nutrients and plant fibers that a potential oatmeal provider has to offer -it also has so many types. Therefore, I categorized these packs according to their benefits and what type of person you can be in choosing your oatmeal.

1. Old Soul for Old-Fashioned Oats

Its whole grain is steamed, flattened, and flaked. For elders who are willing to wait, this oatmeal is best for you. This is my 5-minute late oatmeal on-the-go. Unlike fast-cooking oatmeals, old-fashioned oats require a longer period of time to cook. Before turning into creamylicious goodness and luscious –waiting is the best guarantee you can offer to satisfy your tummy. You can add toppings of your choice for a healthier breakfast.

Ingredients: 1 serving

  • ½ cup old-fashioned oats
  • 1 cup of water or milk
  • Salt (optional)

How to Cook:

  • Stove Top
    Boil water or milk. Add oats and a pinch of salt (optional). Stir occasionally. Wait 5 minutes over medium heat. Serve with toppings (optional).
  • Microwave
    Combine water or milk. Add oats and a pinch of salt (optional) in a microwavable bowl. Set on HIGH 2-3 minutes. Stir and serve hot with toppings (optional).

2. Fast thinker for Instant-Cooking Oats

In order for us to be functional during the day, we need to eat our breakfast. And how could we do that if we’re far from home? No microwaves. No stove. Well, think fast and don’t have to worry because oatmeal providers made one-minute travel buddy oatmeal.

Instant oats are dried, cut, and rolled thin. It is very much easy to chew and can be a bit mushy too. Instant oats are the fastest to cook. However, it is less healthy because of its added mixed ingredients such as sugar or salt.

Ingredients: 1 serving

  • 1 sachet of instant oats
  • 1 cup of hot water or milk

How to Cook:

No need for you to use a microwave or any cooking appliances especially when you’re not at home. All you need is hot water of which you think can dissolve your oats. Mix the two, adjust the liquid for the desired thickness. Stir and let stand for 1-2 minutes. Serve hot.

3. Hot Tempered for Irish Oats

Irish or Scottish oats are steel-bladed-cut oats, looking more like a grain of rice. These steel oats are healthier than rolled oats because they have less water absorbance. Its texture is chewier that makes it a good partner for stews and soups.

This is my in-house oatmeal because it would take about half an hour to cook. Their groats are cut into tiny separate pieces and are designed to digest longer than a traditional oat. Therefore, we’ll surely enjoy this oat before feeling hungry for the next 4 hours of the day.

Ingredients: 1 serving

  • ¼ cup of Irish oats
  • 1-1/2 cups of hot water or milk

How to Cook:

  • Stove Top
    Put water or milk in a saucepan to boil. Bring in oats. Stir occasionally and reduce heat to low. Let it simmer for 25-30 minutes. Stir again until reaching the desired texture. Serve hot with toppings or bread.

For the best oatmeal-at-home experience, you can add the following plenty toppings of your choice.

  • Toasted Walnuts
  • Chopped Pistachios
  • Dried Cranberries
  • Maple Syrup and Egg
  • (Any fruits available) Strawberry, Banana, and Chocolate or Caramel Syrup
  • Coconut Milk and Brown Sugar
  • Cinnamon Bread and Butter
  • Cashew Nuts, Macadamia Nuts, Hazelnuts and Fried Garlic
  • Candied Ginger
  • Ginger Bread, Lemon Zest
  • Parmesan Cheese
  • Sausage Patty and Sautéed Onion

This article has been initially published last

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